Door Access Control Systems can create SERIOUS CONFLICT

A door access control system is an electronically based means of entering a building, usually through the use of a card or keypad.

If you have a door access control system at your place of work or at home then you know that a system like this can create serious conflict with your coworkers or neighbors. This access system often places the responsibility of securing an entire structure solely on your shoulders when you are faced with piggybackers or tailgaters. Piggybacking occurs when someone with legitimate access to a building allows someone without access to the building to come in with them. Tailgating occurs when an intruder slips into the building with a person without their knowledge.

If you are uncomfortable with your door access control system or if you are considering having one installed then note the following suggestions and warnings listed below to help you better deal with a security system like this.

  • Understand that people will attempt (and may succeed) to piggyback or tailgate their way into the building.
  • Understand that no matter how much you train employees or neighbors on the importance of the system, many will become infuriated if they forget their access code or badge and are confronted when attempting to piggyback.
  • Understand that every time you allow a piggybacker or tailgater to come into a facility with you, you could be putting the safety of people or property inside the building at risk.
  • Have a plan ready to implement should you be faced with a piggybacker or tailgater:
    • Avoid confronting a person who is attempting entry via unapproved methods unless you are ready for the repercussions of doing so.  Repercussions could be anything from an unpleasant exchange all the way up to being accused of targeting people in some way to even violence, all of which could create long-lasting problems for both of you.   Many humans do not do well with confrontation or having to explain their behavior or whereabouts to others and you questioning motive in times of piggybacking or tailgating may create a very bad situation with someone you might have to see on a regular basis.
    • Scan the perimeter before entry and exit EVERY time. If you see someone lingering then do not go through the door, it is that simple. Just do not go through the door. Instead just smile at them if they have seen you and walk away as if you have forgotten to do something. This strategy is a huge time waster, especially if your arms are full of boxes or groceries, but it prevents confrontation and potential long-term animosity on the part of the person you would be questioning for access. What if the person asks you if they can come in with you? What if, what if, what if. Blah, blah, blah. You are already worrying too much. It does not matter what they say to you if you are implementing the strategy of just walking away instead of going through the door. If they ask you to let them in you can just tell them you cannot because you forgot the code. This strategy can still cause long-term animosity from the person you ignored because they may have a valid reason to gain entry but I have found this to be the calmest method of dealing with people attempting to gain access through alternative methods.  If they refuse to leave then finally break the news to them that you will not let them in.  But do not get angry if someone else lets them in.  You can only do what you can do.  You cannot control the behavior of others and there are always going to be people who do not care about security just like there are always going to be people who forget that it is because of proper security protocol that they are being questioned.
  • I do not recommend a door access control system when only ONE door makes up the whole system. I have been using door access control systems for about 15 years now and I am not impressed with one door just based on the high number of piggyback and tailgating attempts I have witnessed and then the fallout that occurs between coworkers or neighbors should someone be questioned when he or she attempts entry without proper codes or cards.
  • However, I really like a door access control system when TWO or more doors make up the whole system. It is a setup that creates a great deal of work for potentially malicious visitors and it also creates second chances for people with proper access who have concerns about who has entered the facility with them. Here is an example of a setup I like: the outer perimeter of the building has a door access control system. Once people make it through this first door, they are in a waiting area where there is a table and a phone. This waiting area allows a person to compose themselves should they be second-guessing a piggybacker or tailgater. A legitimate person has an opportunity to call someone from this area, set down packages or simply sit down themselves to kill time to avoid letting the questionable party through the second door. Several feet away is the second door access control system that must be used to actually get into the main part of the building. Beware, this waiting area is an enclosed space that could be putting you face to face with a malicious party. This waiting area can quickly become a dangerous space so train to fight like a warrior now should you ever need to protect yourself:)
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