The grandiose IT ego

If you work in IT or work with IT then you probably know what the “grandiose IT ego” is.  Since it is a phrase used to describe something or someone technical then I guess we have to refer to it using an acronym (huge eye roll):  GITE (and I don’t mean a holiday house in France).

I rarely encounter the GITE but when I do it is something that ranks high on my list of unpleasant experiences that I would gladly trade instead for moments of crawling on my belly through deep muck in a scary jungle infested with disease, flesh-eating insects and cannibalistic tribes.

I write this post because a typical GITE made the news recently for doing something that a typical GITE does:  publicly mock people who ask “stupid” questions.  Not cool.

Unfortunately, I cannot offer sound advice on how to deal with GITE’s since my method is that of ignoring them on an epic level.  I am proud to say I am an Olympic champion in the arena of ignoring and, unless you are at this level, I do not recommend it because bottling up that kind of frustration could cause your head to pop off if you are not properly trained on how to internalize such things.

There is one thing I can do if you are a new IT up-and-comer.  I can offer a few tips on how to prevent becoming the dreaded GITE:

  • Your clients are paying you for an IT service for a reason.  They either do not have time to do the task themselves or they do not know how to do it.  In either case, they are going to ask you questions.  If some of these questions are questions you classify as silly, avoid mocking them for asking such questions.  This is the most important rule to carry with you in any field of study or business setting.  Mocking others quickly propels you into a spotlight of unflattering light that can be seen for miles.   Poking fun is something you do in private with your friends when you are letting off steam.  Keep it private and anonymous and remember this: you ask silly questions to, you just do not realize it.
  • Avoid the urge to lecture others on how they should be doing something.  Work on your delivery by offering suggestions or just appreciating others as they are instead of a scene like this:  hovering over someone’s shoulder as they drive and sighing and rolling your eyes as you tell them how slow they are and that they should be selecting Ctrl-C to copy text instead of selecting “edit” > “copy” from the top menu.  There are 1200 different ways to do anything on a computer, no one cares that you want to be the Overlord of Copy Commands.

 

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